The Reflection Pool

Life Isn’t a Holiday and That’s Good

You probably just spent some time reading, hiking, skating, or one of many other activities on the holiday break. Wasn’t it great? Vacations can be truly wonderful. I look forward to them for a chance to disconnect from work and do some things I love. For instance, having the time to read more fiction is such a treat. I’ve always been a reader and remember my parents yelling at me to stop reading and get outside. They were right because I love outside too. Still, settling down on the couch with a book I’ve been looking forward to and losing myself in it is wonderful. It’s easy to forget about the world and indulge.

Some people mistake a vacation for real life. They yearn for retirement when they “can do whatever they want”. I know those who count the days to the next holiday. I just can’t get on board with this kind of thinking. While I love time off as much as anyone and yes, work can be stressful at times, what I am doing needs meaning beyond pleasing myself.

A full, satisfying, and happy life must have purpose. This can take so many forms, and we don’t need to be in a fancy job or have a lot of money to find it. I try to think about what my purpose is every day. A fresh start in 2019 is a perfect time to remind myself of that.

Recently Barack Obama challenged followers on Twitter and Instagram to take up the challenge of making something better.

Obama gives many wonderful examples in his feed, and I’ve been thinking about this a lot. I know where I want to go to try to make a change in my community.

What about you? What is your purpose?

5 thoughts on “Life Isn’t a Holiday and That’s Good

  1. Sue, I read this post early yesterday, and I continue to think about it. I like the idea of doing something to make a difference in the community and giving back. It makes me think about the Belonging and Contributing Frame in the Kindergarten Document. I’m really not sure what I want to do yet, but your post has me thinking.

    As an aside, this post really hit home yesterday because over the Break, we had a fire in our kindergarten outdoor classroom space. Kids came back to see what happened yesterday. Soon after they reflected and made sense of the world — as kids do — we went to the forest, and a group of children found some of our outdoor furniture in the woods. They worked so hard to move these heavy pieces out of the trees and back to our outdoor classroom space.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BsVpRRqhjES/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BsVrdehBIls/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BsVtNaXBk1o/

    None of what the kids did changed what happened outside, but it did make them feel as though they did something useful, helped out the school, and made even a small difference. There’s something wonderful about these kinds of feelings, and I think that I also want to feel these things. Thanks for the reminder!

    Aviva

    1. Aviva, building and supporting community in schools is an important part of educators’ work. It’s obvious you recognize that!I know your work provides a focus for your life. Have you considered the broader community outside education?

      1. Thanks for the comment, Sue! I’ve been thinking about this broader community recently. I used to volunteer at a retirement home near my house. I really enjoyed these weekly connections. I also did some canvassing for different organizations before. I stopped both for different reasons, but I wonder if I need to start up something outside of education. I do kind of love education though. Kids are where my heart is at! Is there a way to combine different interests? I’m still thinking about this one.

        Aviva

        P.S. Your reply has me thinking about a blog post I’ve been thinking about for a while now. I wonder if it’s time to write it.

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