EXPLORE – #oneword for 2018

January 1 is a “let’s get to it” day. Last week, I set my reading goal for the year. I created my January bullet journal pages. I also did laundry, but don’t worry, that’s not just a new year’s thing.

Now it’s time for my #oneword which has become a yearly tradition (see my last three #oneword posts below). I choose #oneword because it provides me with a reflection framework. As I’ve mentioned in this space, I’m a terrible procrastinator and setting myself the challenge of choosing #oneword helps me focus.

I also love the brevity of #oneword. Less is more.

This year feels like a gateway year.  My career as a school board employee is coming to an end sometime in the next few years, and I’m thinking about what is next. I want to investigate what it possible. I want to let ideas macerate and mingle.

I’ve always wanted to work on my doctorate – is now the time? What do I want my mark to be on this world? How can I best use my strengths and interests in this part of my life?

This quote from Steve Jobs just appeared in my Twitter timeline and it feels right to use it.

“And most important have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become.”

That’s what I want to explore this year.


Here’s a big shout out to Julie Balen, Ontario educator, who is leading #onewordONT this year through her Google+ Community OneWordOnt Blogs.  Join and share your #oneword.

Previous #oneword posts:

GRACE – #oneword for 2017

ESSENTIAL – #oneword for 2016

One Word for 2015

Top Three Posts of 2017

I like to do a little roundup of which posts generated the most traffic each year. It’s always interesting, a little like my #bestnine on Instagram.  What others like best is not always what I thought.

Here are the top three of 2017.

Www.pixabay.com

My Leadership Inquiry: the new Problem of Practice 

Thanks to the work of Steven Katz and Lisa Ain Dack, as described in The Intelligent, Responsive Leader, I describe my own leadership inquiry as I work to become a better leader.

A Simple and Powerful Leadership Truth

This was an insight for me, and may be for others too?  I try to keep it in mind every day.

Let’s Have Classrooms Full of Books!

Inspired by visits to classrooms and also the work of Pernille Ripp, a danish-american educator.

What about you – do your year end reflections include a “best of” list?

I Don’t Have Survey Fatigue

Photo Credit: FreeBloggerPro.com Flickr via Compfight cc

Confession time: my name is Sue and I like doing surveys. Weird, right? I’m the one who actually clicks on the link in a request email and completes all those questions. Cheesy magazine questionnaires, coffee shop service feedback forms, online shopping experiences, I pretty well do them all. I even do workplace surveys. I figure I can’t complain if I’m not willing to offer my opinion or experience.

The surveys I enjoy the most are those that teach me about myself. I’ve blogged about the importance of feedback, and this kind of survey enhances my self understanding. This past year, I’ve completed the Implicit Bias Test , the Quiet Revolution Personality Test (introvert or extrovert?) and most recently, the Strengths Test and the 4Di questionnaire.

But the real question is: so what? Is there a point to all this navel gazing? Let me use the 4Di to answer.  This particular test looks at operating style not personality. It shows you how you like to learn, make decisions and collaborate at work. Our senior team completed it, and it was illuminating. Since we shared our results, it helped me to understand those I work with a lot better and to think about how to interact more effectively within the team. My “balanced red” style is different from when I took the test years ago as a principal, perhaps because I’m in a different role. “Balanced red” essentially means I like to stop and decide best. For those of you who work with me, you might recognize that “cut to the chase, make a decision and act” style. It works great sometimes, but other times it’s better to slow down to understand or to go and create, the two other operating styles the test identifies.

Having different styles on a team only makes it stronger. We can use the different styles at different times, depending on the kind of work we are doing. Do we need to make a decision? Do we need to learn and understand better? Do we need to consider creative possibilities and options? Even more, how can each of us learn to use styles that we are not comfortable with?

All this knowledge helps me be a better co-worker, leader and, to be honest, a better person.  That’s important to me.  Maybe you would consider doing a survey too?